Leaving Arizona, Headed To Texas!

Point of Rocks RV Park, between Prescott and Prescott Valley, Arizona

Point of Rocks RV Park, between Prescott and Prescott Valley, Arizona

The last installment of the blog found us at the Point of Rocks RV park, a delightful, friendly and beautiful place located between Prescott and Prescott Valley, Arizona.  This unique place is nestled among large boulders.  The spaces are generous and there is lots of privacy.  Point of Rocks is an older park and it’s age is showing somewhat, but still and all, it’s a very cool place.

Debbie, Gary, Dee Dee and Thee Bob at an excellent post-Thanksgiving, Pre-Christmas turkey dinner prepared by Debbie.

Debbie, Gary, Dee Dee and The Bob at an excellent post-Thanksgiving, Pre-Christmas turkey dinner prepared by Debbie.

As usual, we had a great time visiting our good friends Gary and Debbie Paulson.  Had a nice post-Thanksgiving-Pre-Christmas turkey dinner at their place.  Also got to visit their latest land acquisition, a nice acre of land way out in the county, where they plan to build their teeny-weeny retirement home.

I mentioned in the previous post that the check engine light on our truck came on as we were pulling up the long hill in I-40, after departing Bullhead City, AZ.  We took it into the Dodge dealer in Prescott who did their best to get it fixed, but they were constrained by factory procedures.  Here is what we had to go through:

First trip to the dealer – they re-flashed the ROM.  That fix lasted about day.

Second trip to the dealer – they replaced a wiring harness.  That fix lasted about an hour.

Third trip to the dealer – they replaced the oxygen sensors.  That last about 3 hours. As we were leaving town, on our way to Apache Junction and Lost Dutchman State Park, it came on again. So, we spent almost 2 entire days, and a total of 3 trips back to the dealership.

View of Superstition Mountain from our campsite at Lost Dutchman State Park

View of Superstition Mountain from our campsite at Lost Dutchman State Park

Impending blooms, cholla cactus, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Impending blooms, cholla cactus, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Sunrise silhouettes Superstition Mountain, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Sunrise silhouettes Superstition Mountain, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Desert detail, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Desert detail, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Storm clouds over Superstition Mountain, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Storm clouds over Superstition Mountain, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Desert scene, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Desert scene, Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona

Every Arizona State Park we have visited has been excellent, and Lost Dutchman is no exception.  It’s a magnificent place, located at the very foot of the Superstition Mountains.  Large spaces, great views and a very friendly staff, largely consisting of volunteers.  We spent 3 days there and I had a great visit with an old ASU graduate school buddy, Neil Miller, who showed up in his vintage Morgan, a very cool automobile.  We would have like to have spent more time exploring the area, but, as outlined above, the truck check engine light continued to plague us.  I managed to get a local Dodge dealer to squeeze us in on a Friday morning, and act of pure kindness on their part since their service department was totally maxed out.  I showed up at 8 AM and they told me that it should be fixed by noon.  Noon came and I was told 3 PM as they were having a hard time diagnosing the problem.  3 PM came and went.  Finally, at 5:45 PM it was completed.  We had to spend the entire day at the dealership waiting, instead of being out walking the trails of Superstition Mountain.  Turns out the issue was a wire running to a sending module (which they also replaced) to an oxygen sensor  was not properly seated.  They blamed it on the Prescott dealer.  Anyhow, they seemed to have fixed the issue, as we have not seen the light come back on. (Knock on wood.)  Even though we had to miss a lot of Lost Dutchman SP and the surrounding area, we have already booked another 5 days in March (where are going to meet up with Gary and Debbie) and plan to do lots of exploring.  This is really a very cool place.

OK then.  From Lost Dutchman State Park we headed south to Benson, AZ., to meet up with our friends Gary and Debbie, and their brand shiney, new, spiffy, very cool  Winnebago motorhome.  And, just as we travel with our guys, Charlie-the-dog and Dylan-the-cat, they bring their African Gray parrot, Pepper – big cage and all.  We all stayed at this nice RV park, Cochise Terrace, which sits up on a hill, overlooking the town.  Nice views and plenty of space for the dog to run and the cat to skulk around.  We did a couple of day trips, the first to Kartchner Caverns State Park, where there are a series of ‘live’ caves (meaning that water is still present, causing features in the caves to continue growing.)  Kartchner Caverns (named after the original land owners) is very well protected; the groups that travel through them are kept small – our tour to the ‘Big Room’ was limited to 15 people.  They protect the delicate cave infrastructure in several ways: to enter the caves you pass through 3 airlocks and a ‘mist bath’ to minimize disbursement of lint.  This Arizona State Park is well managed and the tour is well worth the $23/person admission.  And, if we had the whole thing to do over again, we would have stayed at the campground in the Park.  Great views and plenty of space.  Maybe next time.

Gary, Dee Dee and Debbie with our very knowledgeable bird tour guide at the Oasis Bird Sanctuary north of Benson, Arizona.  She knew the name of almost every one of the 850-plus birds located there.  No kidding.

Gary, Dee Dee and Debbie with our very knowledgeable bird tour guide at the Oasis Bird Sanctuary north of Benson, Arizona. She knew the name of almost every one of the 850-plus birds located there. No kidding.

Dee Dee with our good friends, Gary and Debbie, at the entrance to the Oasis Bird Sanctuary, north of Benson, Arizona

Dee Dee with our good friends, Gary and Debbie, at the entrance to the Oasis Bird Sanctuary, north of Benson, Arizona

Cockatiel, Oasis Bird Sancturary, near Benson, Arizona.  Pretty smart bird who gnawed away part of a protective barrier to get a better view

Cockatiel, Oasis Bird Sancturary, near Benson, Arizona. Pretty smart bird who gnawed away part of a protective barrier to get a better view

Bright red Macaw, Oasis Bird Sanctuary, near Benson, Arizona

Bright red Macaw, Oasis Bird Sanctuary, near Benson, Arizona

Dee Dee and African Gray parrot, Oasis Bird Sanctuary, near Benson, Arizona

Dee Dee and African Gray parrot, Oasis Bird Sanctuary, near Benson, Arizona

Our second trip was (way) out to the Oasis Bird Sanctuary, which can be found about 30 miles north of Benson; the last 7 miles of the trip are on a dirt road.   This is a very cool place that houses over 850 exotic birds.  They end up here because they were abandoned by their owners (dick heads), caught by different Animal Control agencies, or just given up by their owners.  Also, this is the last stop for all the birds, many of whom can live for more than 50 years.  They are guaranteed a good home for the remainder of their life.  Although they get requests almost every day to adopt birds, they can only take in about 20 per year.  This is an amazing place that is composed of many aviaries sitting on several acres, well worth the visit.  It operates totally on donations from a variety of sources.  And, you must schedule your visit in advance.  They spent about 3 hours with us and we got to walk right into most of the aviaries.  What a great experience.  And, you have no idea how NOISEY birds can be.  After the tour, a donation is expected – they tell you this in advance. (Gary gave them the equivalent of $25/person.)  Finally, you must make arrangements in advance for a tour…you can’t just show up.

Dee Dee and her boys, Tombstone, Arizona

Dee Dee and her boys, Tombstone, Arizona

Dee Dee trying on hats at a store in Tombstone, Arizona.  A sign next to the hats said, "Hats are for buying, not for picture taking."  Guess I musta missed it.

Dee Dee trying on hats at a store in Tombstone, Arizona. A sign next to the hats read, “Hats are for buying, not for picture taking.” Guess I musta missed it.

After Gary and Debbie departed so Gary could go back to work (sucker!), we took another day trip down to Tombstone, about 25 miles south of Benson.  Pretty much what you might expect – touristy to a large extent, but still fun to walk around.  Big Nose Kate’s Saloon is pretty neat inside.  One thing definitely worth a visit is the old Cochise County Courthouse, which has been converted to an excellent museum.  Here, you get a real sense of what life was like when the Earp brothers and Doc Holliday walked the streets.

Dunes, White Sands National Recreation Area

Dunes, White Sands National Recreation Area

Dune detail, White Sand National Recreation Area

Dune detail, White Sand National Recreation Area

Metals walkway over protected area, White Sands National Monument

Metals walkway over protected area, White Sands National Monument

Dee Dee and Charlie walking the dunes at White Sand National Monument, New Mexico

Dee Dee and Charlie walking the dunes at White Sand National Monument, New Mexico

Charlie's been here.  White Sands National Monument, New Mexico

Charlie’s been here. White Sands National Monument, New Mexico

From Benson, we head off to Las Cruces, New Mexico for a few days.  Las Cruces is primarily a military town, supported by the White Sands Missile Range.  It’s a very friendly, historic and rapidly growing area.  It also is the location of the worst Denny’s Restaurant on the planet.  No kidding.  Barf City.  It’s as if they actually try to provide the customer with world-class crappy service, long waits, cold food, botched orders, luke warm coffee and no utensils.  No Kidding.  (And we are actually Denny’s fans.)   To counter this experience, on Christmas Day we found another Denny’s in town (the ONLY restaurant in the area that was open); it was OK, so Denny’s partially redeemed themselves.

We also drove out to White Sands National Monument for the day.  Great wave-like dunes of sand have engulfed 275 square miles of desert, creating the world’s largest gypsum dune field. The sand really is pure white and there is a nice drive right through the dunes.  Despite the crowds, we easily found places where you could walk where there were no other people and no footprints.

Merry Christmas from Las Cruces, New Mexico

Merry Christmas from Las Cruces, New Mexico

After Las Cruces, we headed down I-90 for Alpine, Texas, via El Paso.  It was cold and spitting snow as we passed through town.  Once we cleared El Paso, the real space of Texas started to reveal itself.  Texas is BIG, and you can really feel it.  It’s a long way from anything to anywhere.  We really like Texas.  One the way to Alpine you pass through Marfa, known for the fake Prada storefront just west of town.  It’s formality and shape stand out in stark contrast to the surrounding prairie.  We would have shared a picture of it with you, but by the time we passed it there was no room to pullover.  Bummer.

One of the notable features when you are entering Alpine is the old (but still active) railroad overpass on I-90.  Even though I-90 is a main thoroughfare, the clearance of the bridge is only about 13’ 4”.  The height of our 5th wheel is also 13’4”, so we decided not to risk and to take a well-traveled detour around it.  The locals tell a story of the time a large semi-truck/trailer passed under and didn’t quite make it.  Almost everyone in town showed up with their lawn chairs to watch as they let the air of the tires to lower the vehicle enough to clear.  Wahooo!

We stayed at this place called the Lost Alaskan RV Park, about a mile north of town.  One of the very best places we have stayed so far.  Extremely friendly and very spacious.  With a great fenced dog run, so it rates high on Charlie’s list as well.  It seems as if everyone in Texas we have met so far seems genuinely happy to meet you.  What a place.

After Alpine, we headed south to Big Bend National Park, located at the ‘Big Bend’ of the Rio Grande River between Texas and Mexico.  Several friends who are considering traveling to Big Bend NP have asked us for our opinion of the place, so here ya go…

Ocotillo cactus detail, Big Bend National Park, Texas

Ocotillo cactus detail, Big Bend National Park, Texas

Detail, prickly pear cactus, Big Bend National Park, Texas

Detail, prickly pear cactus, Big Bend National Park, Texas

Big Bend is an immense and magnificent place.  ‘Spectacular’ is a fitting adjective.  Amazing, rugged mountains and beautiful desert.  Very remote in many ways (Alpine and Sanderson, about 100 miles away, are the closest towns.)  There is a lot to see and do in this place, but be prepared to drive a long way to anything to see stuff.  OK, that’s the ‘up’ side.  The downside (at least for some people) is that it’s an older National Park that has not really been upgraded for contemporary RV’s (some of you might see that as a positive.)  There are several campgrounds, but they are all geared for tent campers or very small RV’s – like under 24’ LOA.  Also, be prepared to dry camp (not really a bid deal – there are places to fill up with water before you enter the campgrounds) as none of the campgrounds have any services at the sites, except for one commercial operation located at the south end of the park in Rio Grande Village; it’s a total joke and we suggest avoiding it.  If you have ever stayed at an RV park in Las Vegas (known for cramming rigs into very small spaces), then you be right at home in this place.  It’s basically a converted parking lot and extremely narrow.  We drove through it and there was barely room even for our truck to pass through.  It’s a wonderment how any of the RV’s in there (the place was packed) got in there.

View of Mexico, the Rio Grande River and Texas.  Look carefully and you can see our 5th wheel in the left center of the image

View of Mexico, the Rio Grande River and Texas. Look carefully and you can see our 5th wheel in the lower right center of the image

Mexicans cross the Rio Grand and leave this little volunteer 'stores' and many locations along the Rio Grande River in Big Bend National Park.

Mexicans cross the Rio Grand and leave these little volunteer souvenir ‘stores’ at many locations along the Rio Grande River in Big Bend National Park.

Mexican cowboy crossing the Rio Grand to check on his souvenir sales

Mexican cowboy crossing the Rio Grand to check on his souvenir sales

Mexican cowboy who crossed the river on his magnificent palomino

Mexican cowboy who crossed the river on his magnificent palomino

Waxy cactus (I forget the real name) used for making candles, cosmetics, etc.  Big Bend National Park, Texas

Waxy cactus (I forget the real name) used for making candles, cosmetics, etc. Big Bend National Park, Texas

Reed detail, Big Bend National Park, Texas

Reed detail, Big Bend National Park, Texas

Prickly pear cactus, Big Bend National Park, Texas

Prickly pear cactus, Big Bend National Park, Texas

We stayed at the main campground at the south end of the park in Rio Grande Village.  Beautiful sites, lots of trees and space in between.  But, only about 3-4 of them can accommodate RV’s over 30’ in length.  If you plan to go here, it’s imperative that you make a reservation on-line.  (If you want a suggestion as to which sites are the largest, feel free to contact us and we will give you a recommendation.)  We were lucky and had reserved a site that would fit us, but even then getting in was a bit of a struggle.  Also of note is a Texas State Park immediately to the west, and adjacent to, Big Bend National Park.   Dee Dee talked to a guy who had been there and was told the accommodations there were better.  Something to look into for next time.

We cut our visit to Big Bend National Park short for two reasons:  there was a nasty weather front moving in; getting out of there for our next destination, Del Rio, also on the Rio Grande/Mexico border, might have been problematic.  But perhaps the biggest reason was the mass of humanity that invaded the Park for the Christmas/New Year’s break.  There were just too many people; they were everywhere you went.  Traffic was awful.  And speaking of traffic, we encountered numerous DWA’s who really should not be allowed anywhere near a car or highway.  No kidding.

So, three days into our planned 6 day stay we left for Del Rio, Texas.  And a good thing, too, as we were literally about 3 hours ahead of freezing rain and impassible (several were closed) roads.  We stayed at this place called Broke Mill RV park.  Friendly and adequate, but about 6 miles from town.  Del Rio is actually a pretty big place (it has a super Walmart, so there ya go…)  You can take a cab across the border to Ciudad Acuna, but the guy who ran the RV park said it’s hardly worth the visit because ‘there was nothing really there.’  So we decided to skip it.  I forgot to mention (above) that as we were leaving Big Bend NP I started to feel sort of crappy.  Well, once we hit Del Rio, the flu set in pretty good.  I have not been really ‘flu sick’ in years, so this was pretty surprising.  So, most of our 4 days in Del Rio were spent with me being sick.  And, I was still ill as we packed up and headed for San Antonio, where I got worse with horrible congestion and a severe cough (but, the accompanying hallucinations were pretty good.)   As of today (January 6), I think I am on the road to recovery.  Dee Dee is fine – let’s just hope I have not passed this nasty thing on to her.

And so this chapter ends.  Stay tuned for the next installment…

 

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