Las Vegas, Legends and Whiskey Lickers

Panorama of our companion RV's, Furnace Creek Campground, Death Valley National Park

Panorama of our companion RV’s, Furnace Creek Campground, Death Valley National Park.

Our last exciting chapter left us still in the depths of Death Valley National Park, known to many at ‘The Magical Place.’  Gary whipped up a great Walmart Special turkey breast in his convection microwave (it was remarkably good) and Dee Dee made smashed potatoes (originals from our garden), gravy, peas (also from our garden) and a salad.  Wahoo.  I brought the wine and the Bloody Mary’s and the screwdrivers and the string cheese.  The weather cooperated and the afternoon was delightful; we ate outdoors on a picnic table, next to a roaring fire.  Lots-o-fun.

Gary, Bob and Dee Dee - Thanksgiving dinner in Death Valley

Gary, Bob and Dee Dee – Thanksgiving dinner in Death Valley.

Ricing bikes, Furnace Creek Campground, Death Valley National Park

Ricing bikes, Furnace Creek Campground, Death Valley National Park.

Our very friendly waitress at diner in Beatty, Nevada

Maria, our very friendly waitress at a diner in Beatty, Nevada.

Waiter and bus-boy at diner in Beatty

Jim, the waiter and bus-boy at a diner in Beatty, Nevada.

Cook in the diner where we had a terrific lunch, Beatty, Nevada

Miguel, the cook in the diner where we had a terrific lunch, Beatty, Nevada.

We took a day trip up to Beatty, Nevada, where we (once again) raided the Beatty Nut and Candy Company, and then had a really fine lunch at the little diner where we had eaten several times before.  I should qualify this by saying that at one time it WAS a really good Mexican restaurant, then changed hands and went all to hell, then, about 4 years ago, a new family took it over and it is now back to being beyond good – and they still serve good Mexican food.  Remarkable.  Great cook, great service.  Highly recommend; it’s located at the ‘Y’ headed south on Highway 95, just on the edge of town (sorta across from the newer RV park.)

Mr. Roadrunner, near Furnace Creek, Death Valley

Mr. Roadrunner, near Furnace Creek, Death Valley.  Friendly dude with almost no fear of humans…wonder why?

Furnace Creek Post Office, Death Valley National Park

Furnace Creek Post Office, Death Valley National Park.

Warning signs marking big-ass drop off, near Rhyolyte, Nevada (just outside of Death Valley National Park)

Warning signs marking big-ass drop off, near Rhyolyte, Nevada (just outside of Death Valley National Park.)

Old bank building, Rhyolyte, Nevada

Façade of old bank building, Rhyolyte, Nevada.

The Bob and Rudolf's brother, Beatty Nut and Candy Company, Beatty, Nevada

The Bob and Rudolf’s brother, Ned, Beatty Nut and Candy Company, Beatty, Nevada

We also stopped at Rhyolyte, a defunct mining town that was home to over 8,000 people in the early part of the 20th century.  It pretty much closed down after the 1908-1910 financial crash.  It had several banks, a Union Hall, train station, churches, assy offices, many restaurants and the requisite number of bustling brothels.  It’s also home to a very intact ‘bottle house’ that has been successfully restored after being ravaged by mindless vandals over the years.  The first time I visited it (the bottle house) was in 1969, in the middle of winter, on a road trip with 2 hippie buddies (Jim Barnaby and Jim Warren) from Ellensburg, WA to Tempe, AZ, and back in my 1964-push-button-shifting-transmission-4-door Dodge – investigating ASU as a possible graduate school (ended up going there.)  Anyhow, in 1969 one could walk right up to it and it was is fine condition; today, it’s surrounded by a very high fence.

Dee Dee getting blown away at Ubehebe Crater, Death Valley National Park

Dee Dee getting blown away at Ubehebe Crater, Death Valley National Park. To get a sense of scale, it’s almost a mile to the other side.  One very big hole.

Road leading up to Ubehebe Crater, Death Valley

Road leading up to Ubehebe Crater, Death Valley.

Spent another day driving up to Ubehebe Crater, near the north end of Death Valley, not too far from Mesquite Springs Campground.  There were an amazing number of people there – the parking lot on the west side was totally full of cars, surprising since it was the Sunday after Thanksgiving and most people had pretty much headed for home.  One reason might be that Scotty’s Castle (which is just a few miles away) was completely closed due to the October floods, so perhaps people just diverted there.

The Bob, Gary and Dee Dee, with the Giant Cow, Armagosa, Nevada

The Bob, Gary and Dee Dee, with the Giant Cow, Armagosa, Nevada.  Some people have commented that the Giant Cow was ‘photo-bombing’ the picture.  Not true.  He was asked to join us.

On Monday, November 30, after spending two delightful weeks in Death Valley, we headed up the long grade through Furnace Creek Wash – Highway 190 – and made our way to Sam’s Town in Las Vegas, after making that usual obligatory stop at the Area 51 Alien Gas Station on Highway 95.

Michael, from Red Rock RV Washers, who did a terrific job washing our RV

Michael, from Red Rock RV Washers, who did a terrific job washing our RV.  A very cool, hardworking humble guy (his one flaw was that he did not like Russell Wilson…we pressed him as to why and he said he thought he was ‘overly humble.’  Hmmmm…

Michael, from Red Rock RV Washers, pressure washing our roof

Michael, from Red Rock RV Washers, pressure washing our roof.

Gary and his Giant Margarita, Mexican restaurant in Sam's Town Casino, Las Vegas

Gary and his Giant Margarita, Mexican restaurant in Sam’s Town Casino, Las Vegas.

Jocelyn and Alex, our friendly servers at Panda Express, in Sam's Town Casino, Las Vegas

Jocelyn and Alex, our friendly servers at Panda Express, in Sam’s Town Casino, Las Vegas

So, as I type this missive, we are just wrapping up a week’s stay here at Sam’s.  We really like this place and have stayed here at least 5 times in the past (we have also stayed at Main Street Station, near Fremont Street and in North Las Vegas – both areas we now avoid like the plague.  Dangerous, dirty, crime-ridden and to be avoided.)

Frank Sinatra impersonator at 'Legends' show, Flamingo Hotel, Las Vegas

Frank Sinatra impersonator at ‘Legends’ show, Flamingo Hotel, Las Vegas.  We felt ripped off (see accompanying text as to why…)

Very tall man, evening show at Jimmy Buffet's Margaritaville in Las Vegas

Very tall man, evening show at Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville in Las Vegas.

Adrian, dancer at Jimmy Buffet's Margaritaville, Las Vegas

Adrian, dancer at Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville, Las Vegas.

The Bob and his new friend, Adrian, the Margaritaville Girl, at Jimmy Buffet's

The Bob and his new friend, Adrian, the Margaritaville Girl, at Jimmy Buffet’s.

Gary and show performer, Jimmy Buffet's Margaritaville, Las Vegas Strip

Gary and show performer, Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville, Las Vegas Strip.

Mark, our super-nice bus driver, Sam's Town shuttle to The Strip

Mark, our super-nice bus driver, Sam’s Town shuttle to The Strip.

Todd, our Sam's Town shuttle driver...very experienced and a lot friendlier that he looks

Todd, our Sam’s Town shuttle driver…very experienced and a lot friendlier that he looks.

Security guard, Harrahs Casino, Las Vegas

Security guard, Harrah’s Casino, Las Vegas.

Sam’s Town: it’s been fun – cheap drinks, a multiplex theatre complex, great buffet, many good restaurants and free shuttle to both The Strip and Fremont Street.  We had one both disappointing and yet exceptional evening:  We bought tickets months ago to a show called “Legends”, at the Flamingo Hotel on The Strip , an evening  that features impersonators of performing ‘Legends.’  We had front row seats – pretty cool except the chairs were like the kind you would find at a crappy buffet restaurant.  The performances were just OK, (Michael Jackson, Madona, Taylor Swift (gag) and Frank Sinatra (yea).)  What was not cool was that they also advertised Elvis and Celine Dion – both no-shows.  We also paid for a dinner as part of the ticket…but they neglected to tell us the restaurant was closed that day – even though we called to check a few days in advance and were told it was open.  No refund was offered (we did not even bother asking we were so pissed-off.)  So, the evening semi-sucked – we have actually been to a few free cabaret shows that have been better.  Not a total loss, but a big disappointment.  (I went online and gave them a scathing review…check it out at http://legendsinconcert.com – assuming they have the guts to post it.)  One thing worth mentioning is that we have seen several other big-ticket shows over the years and have always been treated like royalty.  No more Flamingo for us.

HOWEVER, after the disappointing show, that same evening we decided to go to our most favorite place in Las Vegas, Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville.  WOW!  DOUBLE WOW!  It was the best time we have EVER had there – by far (and we must have been there at least 4-5 times previously.)  We had the best table in the house – really – and were right in the middle of the evening show.  AMAZING!  The performers were friendly and spent time talking with us – especially Adrian, the beautiful lady who comes down the slide and drops into the giant blender (right next to our table).  She was incredibly gracious and so humble; must have spent about 5 minutes chatting with us (as she toweled off.)  The drinks were good and quite potent.  Dinner was acceptable.

So, a crappy event was balanced with an amazing one.  See, good things can happen to good people.

Dee Dee and The Bob, at Boulder/Hoover Dam; Lake Mead and 'bath tub ring' in the back ground.

Dee Dee and The Bob, at Boulder/Hoover Dam; Lake Mead and ‘bath tub ring’ in the back ground.

Tillman Bridge, near Boulder/Hoover Dam

Tillman Bridge at sunset, near Boulder/Hoover Dam.

Late afternoon light, Boulder/Hoover Dam

Late afternoon light, Boulder/Hoover Dam.

Four Korean tourists, from LA, we met at Bould/Hoover Dam. Talk about FRIENDLY!

Four Korean tourists, from LA, we met at Boulder/Hoover Dam. Talk about FRIENDLY!  I offered to take their picture with their camera, and then I said ‘My turn.’  They were so honored that I was interested in them.  What a nice group.

Friendly Harley trike guy, Boulder/Hoover dam; he must have had at least $75,000 tied up in the custom-built Road King conversion. Magnificent machine

Joe, the Friendly Harley trike guy, Boulder/Hoover dam; he must have had at least $75,000 tied up in the custom-built Road King conversion. Magnificent machine.  He told me he lives in Henderson, NV, and rides out to the dam 2-3 times a week.  He was very quiet and unassuming.  Very nice man – he was at least 75 years old.

Garty and our waitress, TC, restaurant in Boulder City, Nevada

Garty and our waitress, TC, at a restaurant in Boulder City, Nevada.  She was somewhat skeptical of my picture-taking motives at first, but once she saw my charming personality, quickly succumbed.

Restroom door, in back of restaurant, Boulder City, Nevada

Restroom door, in back of restaurant, Boulder City, Nevada.

We did a few other things while in the Las Vegas area: drove down to Lake Mead to take Charlie swimming, had lunch in Boulder City at a place we have enjoyed several times previously, drove across Boulder Dam, met some interesting people, found a new and very cool RV park (amazing and right on the lake.)

Dee Dee, The Bob, 'Photo Bomber's', Gary and Debbie, Harrah's, Las Vegas

Dee Dee, The Bob, ‘Photo Bomber’s’, Gary and Debbie, Harrah’s, Las Vegas.

Fremont Street Experience, Las Vegas, Nevada

Fremont Street Experience, Las Vegas, Nevada.  We never, ever tire of this funny, funky, delightful place.  There is one of everything here.

The Bob with Fremont Street characters, Las Vegas

The Bob with Fremont Street Gunslingers, Las Vegas.

"My Girls', Fremont Steet, Las Vegas. I had my picture taken with them a couple of years ago. Cuties!

“My Girls’, Fremont Steet, Las Vegas. I had my picture taken with them a couple of years ago. Cuties!  (And this one was free…)

Dee Dee at one of our most favorite bars in Las Vegas, on Fremont Street. Very potent pours.

Dee Dee at one of our most favorite bars in Las Vegas, on Fremont Street. Very potent pours.

Last drink of the day, boarding the bus near Fremont Street for Sam's Town

Last drink of the day, boarding the bus near Fremont Street for Sam’s Town.  Too much tequila.

We spent a fun evening at Fremont Street, a place we never tire of visiting.  Stopped at the Whiskey Licker Bar – a favorite of ours – and got the usual super-cheep, super-strength drinks.  We tried to get on the new ZIP line that runs the 6-block length of Fremont, but the wait was over 5 hours, so (regretfully) we had to pass.  Next time we will either try to get our tickets on-line or buy them sooner.  If you are interested, as of this date they are $40 for the 90 second – or so – ride, but worth it (at least in our opinion).

You will note that in this edition of the blog there are lots of pictures of interesting people we had the pleasure of meeting during this leg of the trip.  All of the shots were done with my iPhone; all I did was say to them, “Can I take your picture?”  I was never turned town.  Some asked “Why me?” My explanation was always “Souvenir of our trip; I like your looks.”  All were flattered and very gracious.

Anyhow, enough words for now.  Gotta go as the 2-for-1 Happy Hour is starting at The Waterfall in Sam’s…can’t be late – it only lasts for 2 hours with no limit on drinks!

On to Key West – The Conch Republic

Key West, the turning point of our trip.  Wahoo!

Key West, the turning point of our trip. Wahoo!

The further we get into Florida, the more crowded it gets.  More traffic and the campground spaces are smaller – and less available.  This all started once we left Carrabelle (on Florida’s ‘Forgotten Coast.’)  But, that’s to be expected this time of the year.  Everyone knows that Florida is a mecca for snowbirds (OK, we are one); in particular South Florida on the Gulf side.

Our drive from Dade City to Chokoloskee seemed like 250 miles of construction zones.  Then, once we hit Everglade City (about 3 miles from Chokoloskee Island) we ran smack into the annual Seafood Festival that dominates the entire town for 3 days.  After about 15 detours, we made it through town and to our destination – Chokoloskee Island RV Park, where we stayed for 2 weeks.  The folks who run this place, Sonny and Carmen, were super friendly and pretty much set the ‘climate’ for the place.  It’s an older park, composed of about 70% park models and 30% RV spaces.  We had a pretty good spot, wedged (literally) in between 2 park models.  It took a bit of doing to get in, but with Sonny’s expert help we made it unscathed.  Downside of this place – no dog run.  Charlie was bummed.

Our digs at the Chokoloskee RV Park, in Florida.

Our digs at the Chokoloskee RV Park, in Florida.

Palm trees on the shore at Chokoloskee RV Park.

Palm trees on the Gulf shore at Chokoloskee RV Park.

This was a beautiful place, at the end of the road; there is a 3-mile long causeway that gets you there.  It’s on the edge of Everglades National Park, and it really feels like it.  Most of the folks we met here were from places like Tennessee, Georgia, Arkansas, Michigan and even Maine – but not a soul from west of the Mississippi River.  No ‘Left Coasters;’ we were it.  All the folks very laid back and friendly, most cordial and welcoming – easy to be around.  However, when we told them where were from, their eyes just glazed over; they had no concept of the ‘Left Coast’, and really did not seem to care too much about it.  The end of the world for them seemed to be the Mississippi River.  No kidding.  The most common comment we got was, “Don’t it rain a lot up there?”

Platters of food at the Seafood Festival in Everglades City, Florida.

Platters of food at the Seafood Festival in Everglades City, Florida.

Bike parking lot at the Seafood Festival, Everglade City, Florida.

Bike parking lot at the Seafood Festival, Everglades City, Florida.

Once we got settled in we headed back over to Everglades City for the annual Seafood Festival.  This is a big deal here and it swells the population of the area from about 5,000 to 100,000 for 3 days.  We got there early, but still had to park about 6 blocks away.  To be honest, the most we can say about it was that it was extremely crowded.  The seafood was mediocre and very expensive – and mostly deep fried.  The vendors that sold other stuff were essentially the same ones you will find at almost street fair anywhere.  We stayed about 3 hours and then left when it got so crowded you could hardly move.  But, we now can say we had been there.

One of the most popular foods in the area is Stone crab; they were in season when we were there.  They are harvested in traps about 10 – 20 miles off-shore.  When caught, one claw is broken off and the crab is return to regenerate a new one; they can do this 4-5 times in their life-cycle.  We went to a local restaurant one day to try them out.  They were on the menu as a side dish – $26 for four claws! (Tourist price…much cheaper for locals as we discovered later.)  The shells are very thick and hard, and come to you pre-cracked since is takes a small hammer to break them open.  There is not much meat to them, and what there is somewhat bland.  But, we are spoiled on Dungeness crabs from the PNW.

This was the air boat we were on during a tour of the mangroves in Everglades National Park.

This was the air boat we were on during a tour of the mangroves in Everglades National Park.

On the airboat in the Everglades, with Jim and Linda, a couple from Ontario that we met in Chokoloskee.  Interesting couple...

On the airboat in the Everglades, with Jim and Linda, a couple from Ontario that we met in Chokoloskee. Interesting folks…

On air boat tour of the mangroves, Everglades National Park.

On air boat tour of the mangroves, Everglades National Park.

With Bobby, our Everglades airboat tour guide.

With Bobby, our Everglades airboat tour guide.

We took an air boat tour through the mangrove swamp; pretty interesting.  Our guide, Bobby (a local good ol’ boy), was a fun guy and knew the area well.  In some ways, it’s designed to be a thrill ride through mangrove tunnels, accompanied with a lot of sliding sharp turns.  It was an OK experience and we had a good time.  We asked Bobbie if we would see any ‘gators and he told us no, as they don’t like salt water – a statement that was later nullified when we took a NPS boat tour (in a small boat powered by an outboard motor) a few days later, with a different guide; he told us that was BS…and we saw a big-ass ‘gator to prove it.  We also saw a few manatees – beautiful, huge mammals.  That was pretty cool.

Us, in the a mangrove tunnel, Everglades National Park.

Us, in the a mangrove tunnel, Everglades National Park.

Our NPS tour guide, during a boat trip in the Everglades.  Cool guy, calm, laid back and we forgot his name...

Our NPS tour guide, during a boat trip in the Everglades. Cool guy, calm, laid back and we forgot his name…

Pelican on a post, in Everglades National Park.

Pelican on a post, in Everglades National Park.

Osprey, feeding on a fish, in the mangroves, Everglades National Park.

Osprey, feeding on a fish, in the mangroves, Everglades National Park.

Bog-ass ' gator in sunning himself in the mangroves, Everglades National Park.

Bog-ass ‘ gator in sunning himself in the mangroves, Everglades National Park.

Little 'gators, Everglades National Park.

Little ‘gators, Everglades National Park.

Dee Dee, ' gator wrestling in the Everglades, Florida.

Dee Dee, ‘ gator wrestling in the Everglades, Florida.

We booked a room in Key West and headed down there for a few days.  On the way there, you head deeper into the Everglades and have the opportunity to see an immense amount of wildlife – mainly a variety of birds.  It’s really a beautiful and quite amazing journey.  On the way to Key West we made a stop at the smallest US Post Office in the United States, located in Ochopee, FL.

The smallest UP Post Office in the United States, Ocallal, Florida.

The smallest UP Post Office in the United States, Ochopee, Florida.

About 22 miles south of Homestead you come to Key Largo, the beginning of the 100 miles drive on the causeways to Key West.  The average speed the entire way is 45 MPH.  We were travelling on a Sunday – that slowed us down quite a bit.  It seemed like it was bumper-to-bumper traffic the entire trip, but that was fine since it was a great drive.

Front view of our B & B in Key West.

Front view of our B & B in Key West.

A view of our B & B in Key West, Florida.

A view of our B & B in Key West, Florida.

Key West is nothing like we had envisioned.  I was thinking of sandy, palm tree-lined beaches with a few people sitting on them, drinking margaritas, kick’n back listening to Jimmy Buffet tunes.  (OK, not really, but that would have been the ideal, huh?)  In reality, it’s about 8 square miles packed with humanity.  Lots of traffic – and zillions of motor scooters – and very old and narrow streets.  It’s a real party town with lots of and bars (all good) and restaurants (mostly all good).  We found this pet-friendly B & B place at the last minute – a bit pricey ($275/night), but it was right downtown.  We were there in ‘high season’ so there was really not that much to choose from – especially since we waited until about 2 days before to try to get a room reservation.  (We decided not to bring our 5th wheel down for the stay, as RV parks – if you could even get in – and you could not – were charging from $150 – $300+ per NIGHT.  Arrrgghhhh!!)

Cool looking flowers, near our B & B in Key West, Florida.

Cool looking flowers, near our B & B in Key West, Florida.

Palms outside our B & B in Key West, Florida.

Palms outside our B & B in Key West, Florida.

Anyhow, once we found our B & B, we discovered that there was no designated parking – you were on your own.  (This fact was conveniently not mentioned when we made the reservation.)  But, it all worked out great.  I let Dee Dee off in front of the house and then circled the block about 5 times until a disabled spot opened up RIGHT IN FRONT!  Wahoo!!  (We have a disabled placard from Washington.)  We squeezed in and dropped anchor there for 2 days.  The room was very nice – old, ‘Key West Funky,’ in a nice old, historic, neighborhood about a block from the Trolley line (a really neat way to get around – we used it a lot), and the downtown area.  We had a terrific time here and loved every minute of it!  The people are great and there is so much to see and do.  And yes, we did seek out the original Jimmy Buffet’s Margaretiville Bar and had a beer.  It was a cool place, with a great bartender; and we just missed seeing Jimmy…he was there about 6 weeks before we got there.  Oh yeah, also made it to the Hog’s Breath Bar, drank, and bought several of their obligatory t-shirts.  One downside to being in Key West this time of the year, we discovered, were the HUGE cruise ships that came in constantly, sometimes 2-3 at a time; each one dumped a couple thousand folks into town.  Oh well…

Southern most point of the United States in Key West.  We don't know any of these people.  There as a line of folks over a block long, waiting to get a picture of themselves here.  This one was taken from the trolley...

Southern most point of the United States in Key West. We don’t know any of these people. There was a line of folks over a block long, waiting to get a picture of themselves here. This one was taken from the (moving)  trolley…

Tourist waiting for sunset, an evening ritual in Key West.  We don't know any of these people.

Tourists waiting for sunset, an evening ritual in Key West. We don’t know any of these people.  But, it was a really good excuse to drink…

Sunset, Key West, Florida.

Sunset, Key West, Florida.

Cool old truck outside a restaurant in Key West, Florida.

Cool old truck outside B.O.’s Fish Wagon in Key West, Florida.

B.O.'s Fish Wagon, Key West, Florida.  We had beer and conch fritters here.  The inside was funkier than the outside...

B.O.’s Fish Wagon, Key West, Florida. We had beer and conch fritters here. The inside was funkier than the outside…

Conch fritters, Key West, Florida.  Delicious!

Conch fritters at B.O.’s Fish Wagon, Key West, Florida. Delicious!

Dee Dee, at Pepe's Resturant in Key West.  Pepe's is the oldest restaurant in Key West, in continuous operation for over 100 years.  It was about a block from our B & B; we ate there every morning.

Dee Dee, at Pepe’s Cafe in Key West. Pepe’s is the oldest restaurant in Key West, in continuous operation for over 100 years. It was about a block from our B & B; we ate there every morning.

Two obvious bikers, waiting for a table at Pepe's Restaurant in Key West.  We don't know these people, they just looked great in their matching shirts...

Two obvious bikers, waiting for a table at Pepe’s Café, in Key West. We don’t know these people, they just looked great in their matching shirts…

Outside Jimmy Buffett's Margaritaville, Key West, Florida.

Outside Jimmy Buffett’s original Margaritaville, Key West, Florida.

Having a Land Shark Beer at Jimmy Buffett's Margaritaville, Key West, Florida.

Having a Land Shark Beer at Jimmy Buffett’s original Margaritaville, Key West, Florida.

Key West - the end, and the beginning - of the trail for us.

Key West – the end, and the beginning – of the trail for us.

Why did the chicken(s) cross the road?

Why did the chicken(s) cross the road?

After 2 days, we departed Paradise, much poorer but happy, and headed back up to Chokoloskee.  Our stay here marked the turning point of our trip.  After driving over 8,500 miles, we were now officially starting our journey back to Washington.  It was a sad, and yet happy time.  And what better place than Key West, Florida, for it to happen.  And, we will so miss all the chickens that populate the place…

The attack of the giant crustaceans, near Marathon, Florida, in the Keys.

The attack of the giant crustaceans, near Marathon, Florida, in the Keys.

On the way back up Highway 1, through the Keys, we stopped at a few RV Parks to see about booking for a month next year.  Once we found out what it would cost we decided to reconsider.  We found this KOA about 14 miles from Key West that was over $3,000 (plus tax) per month, and units were crammed so tight it was a true wonderment as to how they even managed to get in in the first place.  Unbelievable.  About 30 miles further up on the road, in Grassy Key – not too far from Marathon – we found a ‘much better’ deal – only $2,300 (plus tax) per month.  We decided that if we ever returned (and we hope to, someday), we would probably stay at one of the several RV campgrounds in the Everglades, drive down to Key West and then stay in one of the pet-friendly hotels we found that are on the Trolley line.  And, we would make our room reservations a year in advance – almost a necessity.  After checking with several locals, they suggested coming in December.  The crowds are smaller and the weather is not too bad.

The day we drove back up to Chokoloskee was a warm one – about 80 degrees.  When we passed back through Everglades National Park (again) we counted at least 50 ‘gators sunning themselves on the shores of the canal that bordered the highway.  That was a really great experience.

With our old Modesto friends, Jim and Diane Weatherford, who now live in Dade City, Florida.

With our old Modesto friends, Jim and Diane Weatherford, who now live in Dade City, Florida.

After 2 relaxing weeks on Chokoloskee Island, we headed back north to Dade City to visit some old friends from Modesto, Jim and Diane Weatherford – that was a hoot.  Such great people.  On the way there, we got stuck in a huge traffic jam on Highway 75.  The freeway was totally closed for about 5 hours.  We detoured around the area (along with everyone else…); that elongated our drive by about 4 hours.  Made for a very looong day.

After Dade City, our next stop was Tallahassee where we stayed at one of the crappiest RV parks of the trip – semi-rude (and clueless) check-in lady and way over-priced.  But, we were tired and there was just no place else to stop.  There is much more to this story, but let’s just say it’s on our list of places not to stay ever again.  Not that Tallahassee is a place to be avoided – it’s definitely a great city; we would definitely visit there again…just stay someplace else.

Inside the oldest Catholic Church in Alabama; Mobile, Alabama.

Inside the oldest Catholic Church in Alabama; Mobile, Alabama.

Highway 10, coming out of the tunnel, in Mobile, Alabama.  Their unique City Hall/Courthouse is in the background.

Highway 10, coming out of the tunnel, in Mobile, Alabama. Their unique City Hall/Courthouse is in the background.

Detail, Courthouse Building, Mobile, Alabama.

Detail, Courthouse Building, Mobile, Alabama.

Eggs benedict, ala Spot of Tea Restaurant, Mobile, Alabama.

Eggs benedict, ala Spot of Tea Restaurant, Mobile, Alabama.

Our wonderful host and owner, Ruby, at the Spot of Tea restaurant in old downtown Mobile, Alabama.

Our wonderful host and owner, Ruby, at the Spot of Tea restaurant in old downtown Mobile, Alabama.

View of the USS 'Alabama,' in Mobile, Alabama.

View of the USS ‘Alabama,’ in Mobile, Alabama.

In Mobile, Alabama.  From the bow of the USS Alabama looking aft.

In Mobile, Alabama. From the bow of the USS Alabama looking aft.

Dee Dee on the USS Alabama in Mobile.  Big-ass guns, huh?

Dee Dee on the USS Alabama in Mobile. Big-ass guns, huh?

Dog repair facility on the USS Alabama, in Mobile.  Charlie was beyond repair...

Dog repair facility on the USS Alabama, in Mobile. Charlie was beyond repair…

Getting ready to board the submarine 'Drum' in Mobile, Alabama.

Getting ready to board the submarine ‘Drum’ in Mobile, Alabama.

As we progressed further West, our next stop was Mobile, Alabama.  We spent 3 days here resting up at this terrific RV park – clean, quite, in the woods just outside of town and – can you believe it? – $23 per night!  The cheapest stay of our entire trip, so far.  Not to mention our gracious (it seems everyone in the south is gracious) host, Charlie.  What a neat guy.  We took a day and enjoyed old downtown Mobile where we toured a (4/5 scale) reconstruction historic Fort Conte and then took the free trolley around the historic district.  We had a very friendly driver to explain stuff, and shared the bus with several ‘locals’ who kept us thoroughly entertained.  We had an incredible meal at this very nice restaurant, ‘Spot of Tea,’ where we met Ruby, the owner, who is also a great ambassador for the city of Mobile.  Next we headed over to see the warship USS ‘Alabama’ and the submarine, ‘Drum,’ as well as a very good aerospace museum.  We did more walking and climbing then one could ever imagine.  Exciting, and very tiring, day.  We would come back to Mobile in a heat beat.  It’s a great city.

Thibodeaux's Restaurant in Duson, LA - we took a risk for dinner and it really paid off.  Great place.

Thibodeaux’s Restaurant in Duson, LA – we took a risk for dinner and it really paid off. Great place.

OK, as I type, we are back near Lafayette, Louisiana, where we stayed about 6 weeks ago, on our way to Florida.  A great town with incredible Cajun food.  We are staying at a different place, about 10 miles down the road in Deson.  Nice park, great place to run Charlie-the-Dog, and very friendly.  Last night, we drove into town (Duson) and found this really funky restaurant called Thibodeaux’s.  Looked questionable from the outside, and when we walked in the question got bigger…two old folks watching Judge Judy on an old TV, and not another person to be seen.  But what the hell, we risked it.  Oh, and ‘no alcohol served here,’ when we asked our waiter for a beer (he was partially deaf and had to get his wife to come over to get order.)  But, the food was excellent, and as we sat there, we discovered that they did a terrific take-out business.  So, don’t let outward appearances deceive you…

Later today, we are going back to Prejean’s Cajun Restaurant (we ate there twice on our trip east) for more of our favorite – fried green tomatoes.  Tomorrow, we are headed further west on Interstate 10 and plan to stop about 100 miles or so, on the other side of Houston…

Stay tuned for the next exciting chapter…